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Fraud alert: Fake Netflix, Disney Plus websites stealing user information, credit card details

During the COVID-19 lockdown people are forced to stay indoors and rely a lot on video streaming applications such as Netflix, Disney+, and Amazon Prime Video. These streaming apps are helping people across the world to engage and entertain themselves. But there are some bad sides to it as well. Cybercriminals are leaving no scope to trick people. They are making fake streaming websites to gain access to your personal information.


Cybersecurity firm Mimecast identified around 700 suspicious scam websites mimicking popular-streaming services like Netflix and Disney+, reported The Guardian . While some fake websites are poorly designed and have language errors, some look extremely convincing, selling subscriptions or free accounts in order to steal your personal information and credit card details, the security firm said.

Carl Wearn, the head of e-crime at Mimecast told the publication that they have witnessed a dramatic rise in suspicious domains impersonating a variety of streaming giants for vile purposes.

From fake apps to phishing mails, how cybercriminals are using COVID-19 scare

'These spoof websites often lure unsuspecting members of the public in with an offer of free subscriptions to steal valuable data. The data harvested includes names, addresses and other personal information, as well as stealing credit card details for financial gain,' Wearn told The Guardian.

With the rise in the number of people trying to avail the services of these video streaming platforms, these counterfeit websites pose danger for unsuspecting users. Also, fake video streaming websites aren't the only way cybercriminals are attacking.

As the world is struggling to fight the coronavirus pandemic, fraudsters are using the disease as a scare to target people around the world. We have discussed in the past how these scammers are registering new malicious websites related to COVID-19 in order to steal user information. They have also been setting up fake COVID-19 tracking dashboards that do not let you track the spread of coronavirus but allows the cybercriminals to hack your computer and steal your personal data, passwords, and payment details stored in the web browser.

Pay money or get coronavirus, 'dirty little secret' emails scare with COVID-19

These fraudsters had also put up fake coronavirus apps but luckily, App Store and the Google Play Store restricted COVID-19 related apps on their stores. At the moment, only the authorised coronavirus apps from the health departments and the respective governments of the country are available.

Cybercriminals have also been posing as WHO officials to carry out phishing attacks and trick people to click on malicious links or download harmful content. Recently, we also got to know that the old 'dirty little secret' emails are scaring people with COVID-19. A report by the British security software and hardware company Sophos shows that cybercriminals are using extortion emails claiming they will infect a user's family with coronavirus if the user does not pay the ransom money.

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